Книга Чудеса страны Оз на английском языке для домашнего чтения

Книга Чудеса страны Оз на английском языке для домашнего чтения

Маленький Принц.Начальный уровень (A2).

Книга Чудеса страны Оз на английском языке для домашнего чтения

Приключения Тома Сойера.Начальный уровень (A2).

Книга Чудеса страны Оз на английском языке для домашнего чтения

Собака Баскервилей.Начальный уровень (A2).

Книга Чудеса страны Оз на английском языке для домашнего чтения

Мэри Поппинс.Начальный уровень (A2).

Книга Чудеса страны Оз на английском языке для домашнего чтения

Книга джунглей. Маугли.Начальный уровень (A2).

Книга Чудеса страны Оз на английском языке для домашнего чтения

Двадцать тысяч лье под водой.Начальный уровень (A2).

Книга Чудеса страны Оз на английском языке для домашнего чтения

Путешествие к центру Земли.Начальный уровень (A2).

Книга Чудеса страны Оз на английском языке для домашнего чтения

Пиноккио.Начальный уровень (A2).

Книга Чудеса страны Оз на английском языке для домашнего чтения

Ветер в ивах.Начальный уровень (A2).

Книга Чудеса страны Оз на английском языке для домашнего чтения

Золушка.Начальный уровень (A2).

Спящая красавица.Начальный уровень (A2).

Красавица и чудовище.Начальный уровень (A2).

Таинственный сад.Начальный уровень (A2).

Невеста или тигр?Начальный уровень (A2).

Человек дождя.Начальный уровень (A2).

Челюсти.Начальный уровень (A2).

Пираты Карибского моря: Проклятие Чёрной жемчужины.Начальный уровень (A2).

Пираты Карибского моря: Сундук мертвеца.Начальный уровень (A2).

Пираты Карибского моря: На краю света.Начальный уровень (A2).

Установление личности.Начальный уровень (A2).

Пять зёрнышек апельсина.Начальный уровень (A2).

Голубой карбункул.Начальный уровень (A2).

Пёстрая лента.Начальный уровень (A2).

Али-Баба и сорок разбойников.Начальный уровень (A2).

История Покахонтас.Начальный уровень (A2).

Девушка встречает парня.Начальный уровень (A2).

Тысяча долларов.Начальный уровень (A2).

Бочонок амонтильядо.Начальный уровень (A2).

Продолговатый ящик.Начальный уровень (A2).

Удивительный волшебник из страны Оз — Читать на английском

Introduction

Folklore, legends, myths and fairy tales have followed childhood through the ages, for every healthy youngster has a wholesome and instinctive love for stories fantastic, marvelous and manifestly unreal. The winged fairies of Grimm and Andersen have brought more happiness to childish hearts than all other human creations.

Yet the old time fairy tale, having served for generations, may now be classed as «historical» in the children's library; for the time has come for a series of newer «wonder tales» in which the stereotyped genie, dwarf and fairy are eliminated, together with all the horrible and blood-curdling incidents devised by their authors to point a fearsome moral to each tale. Modern education includes morality; therefore the modern child seeks only entertainment in its wonder tales and gladly dispenses with all disagreeable incident.

Having this thought in mind, the story of «The Wonderful Wizard of Oz» was written solely to please children of today. It aspires to being a modernized fairy tale, in which the wonderment and joy are retained and the heartaches and nightmares are left out.

L. Frank Baum Chicago, April, 1900.

1. The Cyclone

Dorothy lived in the midst of the great Kansas prairies, with Uncle Henry, who was a farmer, and Aunt Em, who was the farmer's wife. Their house was small, for the lumber to build it had to be carried by wagon many miles.

There were four walls, a floor and a roof, which made one room; and this room contained a rusty looking cookstove, a cupboard for the dishes, a table, three or four chairs, and the beds. Uncle Henry and Aunt Em had a big bed in one corner, and Dorothy a little bed in another corner.

There was no garret at all, and no cellar—except a small hole dug in the ground, called a cyclone cellar, where the family could go in case one of those great whirlwinds arose, mighty enough to crush any building in its path.

It was reached by a trap door in the middle of the floor, from which a ladder led down into the small, dark hole.

Книга Чудеса страны Оз на английском языке для домашнего чтения

When Dorothy stood in the doorway and looked around, she could see nothing but the great gray prairie on every side. Not a tree nor a house broke the broad sweep of flat country that reached to the edge of the sky in all directions.

The sun had baked the plowed land into a gray mass, with little cracks running through it. Even the grass was not green, for the sun had burned the tops of the long blades until they were the same gray color to be seen everywhere.

Once the house had been painted, but the sun blistered the paint and the rains washed it away, and now the house was as dull and gray as everything else.

When Aunt Em came there to live she was a young, pretty wife. The sun and wind had changed her, too. They had taken the sparkle from her eyes and left them a sober gray; they had taken the red from her cheeks and lips, and they were gray also. She was thin and gaunt, and never smiled now.

When Dorothy, who was an orphan, first came to her, Aunt Em had been so startled by the child's laughter that she would scream and press her hand upon her heart whenever Dorothy's merry voice reached her ears; and she still looked at the little girl with wonder that she could find anything to laugh at.

Uncle Henry never laughed. He worked hard from morning till night and did not know what joy was. He was gray also, from his long beard to his rough boots, and he looked stern and solemn, and rarely spoke.

It was Toto that made Dorothy laugh, and saved her from growing as gray as her other surroundings. Toto was not gray; he was a little black dog, with long silky hair and small black eyes that twinkled merrily on either side of his funny, wee nose. Toto played all day long, and Dorothy played with him, and loved him dearly.

Today, however, they were not playing. Uncle Henry sat upon the doorstep and looked anxiously at the sky, which was even grayer than usual. Dorothy stood in the door with Toto in her arms, and looked at the sky too. Aunt Em was washing the dishes.

From the far north they heard a low wail of the wind, and Uncle Henry and Dorothy could see where the long grass bowed in waves before the coming storm. There now came a sharp whistling in the air from the south, and as they turned their eyes that way they saw ripples in the grass coming from that direction also.

Suddenly Uncle Henry stood up.

«There's a cyclone coming, Em,» he called to his wife. «I'll go look after the stock.» Then he ran toward the sheds where the cows and horses were kept.

Aunt Em dropped her work and came to the door. One glance told her of the danger close at hand.

«Quick, Dorothy!» she screamed. «Run for the cellar!»

Читать

Предисловие

Удивительно, как меняется время. Сейчас я не могу себе представить детскую книжку, где добрые персонажи позволяют себе махать топором и убивать всяких разных животных. Где тетку (пусть даже и злобную ведьму) можно раздавить домом.

Где одного из главных персонажей, в честь которого и названа книга, можно выкинуть из сюжета в середине книги. И много еще этих «где».

Читайте также:  Местоимения some, much, many и a lot of, few и little: перевод, правило и таблица

Но так писал господин Баум, таким получилась его книга “The wonderful wizard of Oz”: совершенно неполиткорректная, не всегда справедливая, с хэппи эндом, но не таким уж и «хэппи». Впрочем, я забегаю вперед.

“The wonderful wizard of Oz” – прекрасная книга, с очень понятным английским языком. Идиом тут мало, игра слов встречается пару раз (это вам не «Алиса в Стране Чудес»), а повествование самое что ни на есть линейное. Скажу больше. Если это ваша первая книга, которую вы решили прочесть на английском, то вам повезло. Очень правильный выбор.

Текст в этой книге устроен следующим образом: жирным шрифтом выделены сложные грамматические конструкции, слова и идиомы. Сразу за жирным текстом в скобках курсивом будет мой перевод и, если надо, его пояснение.

Да, мой текст всегда в скобках и всегда курсивом. Иногда в прямых скобках вы увидите фразу «буквально —» и фразу «лучше —» или «здесь —».

Это значит, что я привожу прямой, буквальный перевод отрывка, а затем тот, который более уместен в этом конкретном контексте.

В книге я перевел только трудные места текста. Остальное же – ваша работа. Вам точно потребуется словарь, и место, куда вы будете записывать новые слова и обороты. Тогда с каждой прочитанной главой ваш английской будет становиться лучше. Я уверен, что учебные книги с полным переводом текста, будь он построчный или кусками – это плохие учебные книги.

Также, как и двуязычные издания, где на одной странице идет английский текст, а на соседней – его дословный перевод. Почему это плохо? Это слишком облегчает задачу читателя.

Когда вы не работаете, не ищете в словаре новые слова, не думаете над переводом всего предложения, а просто подсматриваете в готовое, вы не учитесь, не привыкаете к структуре английского языка, а просто считываете. Чтение на английском должно быть достаточно сложным, чтобы оно было полезным. По той же причине в конце книги нет словаря, как это обычно бывает.

Это ваша работа, а не моя записывать новые слова, переводить их и запоминать. Да, времени уйдет больше, это скучно, но, если вы не поленитесь и сделаете это, ваши знания и навыки станут лучше. А словарь в конце книги будет заброшен сразу же после прочтения.

Приятного чтения, главное, установите на вашем телефоне хороший словарь, записывайте новые слова и составляйте с ними предложения, которые тоже лучше записывать. Тогда все запомнится. Удачи и спасибо за чтение.

Introduction

Folklore, legends, myths and fairy tales have followed childhood through the ages, for every healthy youngster |подросток| has a wholesome and instinctive love for stories fantastic, marvelous and manifestly unreal. The winged fairies |Крылатые феи| of Grimm and Andersen have brought more happiness to childish hearts than all other human creations.

Yet |Однако| the old time fairy tale, having served for generations, may now be classed as “historical” in the children’s library; for the time has come for a series of newer “wonder tales” in which the stereotyped genie, dwarf and fairyжин, карлик и фея| are eliminated, together with all the horrible and blood-curdling |леденящими кровь| incidents devised |придуманные| by their authors to point |указать на| a fearsome moral to each tale. Modern education includes morality; therefore |таким образом| the modern child seeks only entertainment in its wonder tales and gladly dispenses |избавляется| with all disagreeable incident.

Having this thought in mind |С этими мыслями|, the story of “The Wonderful Wizard of Oz” was written solely to please children of today.

It aspires to being |стремится быть| a modernized fairy tale, in which the wonderment |удивление| and joy are retained |сохранены| and the heartaches and nightmares are left out |оставлены|.

  • L. Frank Baum
  • Chicago, April, 1900.
  • 1. The Cyclone

Dorothy lived in the midst of the great Kansas prairies, with Uncle Henry, who was a farmer, and Aunt Em, who was the farmer’s wife. Their house was small, for the lumber |потому что строительный лес| to build it had to be carried |надо было везти| by wagon many miles.

There were four walls, a floor and a roof, which made one room; and this room contained a rusty looking cookstove, a cupboard for the dishes, a table, three or four chairs, and the beds. Uncle Henry and Aunt Em had a big bed in one corner, and Dorothy a little bed in another corner.

There was no garret |чердака| at all, and no cellar |подвала| – except a small hole dug in the ground, called a cyclone cellar, where the family could go in case one of those great whirlwinds |смерчей| arose, mighty enough to crush any building in its path.

It was reached by a trap door |люк| in the middle of the floor, from which a ladder led down into the small, dark hole.

When Dorothy stood in the doorway and looked around, she could see nothing but the great gray prairie on every side. Not a tree nor a house broke the broad sweep |нарушал широкий простор| of flat country that reached to the edge of the sky in all directions.

The sun had baked the plowed |запек вспаханную| land into a gray mass, with little cracks running through it. Even the grass was not green, for the sun had burned the tops of the long blades until they were the same gray color to be seen |которые можно увидеть| everywhere.

Once the house had been painted |был покрашен|, but the sun blistered |обожгло| the paint and the rains washed it away, and now the house was as dull and gray as everything else.

When Aunt Em came there to live she was a young, pretty wife. The sun and wind had changed her, too. They had taken the sparkle from her eyes and left them a sober gray |скучным и серым.

Буквально sober – трезвый|; they had taken the red from her cheeks and lips, and they were gray also. She was thin and gaunt |изможденная|, and never smiled now.

When Dorothy, who was an orphan |сирота|, first came to her, Aunt Em had been so startled |так была поражена| by the child’s laughter that she would scream and press her hand upon her heart whenever Dorothy’s merry |радостный| voice reached her ears; and she still looked at the little girl with wonder that she could find anything to laugh at |над чем можно посмеяться|.

Uncle Henry never laughed. He worked hard from morning till night and did not know what joy was. He was gray also, from his long beard to his rough boots, and he looked stern and solemn |сурово и торжественно|, and rarely spoke.

It was Toto that made Dorothy laugh, and saved her from growing as gray as |такой же серой как| her other surroundings. Toto was not gray; he was a little black dog, with long silky hair and small black eyes that twinkled merrily on either side of his funny, wee |крошечного| nose. Toto played all day long, and Dorothy played with him, and loved him dearly.

Today, however, they were not playing. Uncle Henry sat upon the doorstep and looked anxiously at the sky, which was even grayer than usual. Dorothy stood in the door with Toto in her arms, and looked at the sky too. Aunt Em was washing the dishes.

From the far north they heard a low wail |низкий вой| of the wind, and Uncle Henry and Dorothy could see where the long grass bowed in waves |клонилась волнами| before the coming storm. There now came a sharp whistling in the air from the south, and as they turned their eyes that way they saw ripples |рябь| in the grass coming from that direction also.

Читать Английский язык с Ф. Баумом. Волшебник Изумрудного Города онлайн (полностью и бесплатно)

  • Английский язык с Ф. Баумом
  • Волшебник Изумрудного Города
  • L. Frank Baum
  • The Wonderful Wizard of Oz
  • Пособие подготовила Ольга Ламонова
  • Метод чтения Ильи Франка
  • 1. The Cyclone (Ураган; cyclone — циклон)

Dorothy lived in the midst of the great Kansas prairies (Дороти жила посреди огромных прерий Канзаса), with Uncle Henry, who was a farmer (с Дядюшкой Генри, который был фермером), and Aunt Em, who was the farmer's wife (и тетушкой Эм, /которая была/ женой фермера).

Their house was small (их дом был маленьким), for the lumber to build it had to be carried by wagon many miles (так как древесину для его строительства: «чтобы его построить» нужно было привозить на повозке за много миль; lumber — пиломатериалы).

There were four walls (/у него/ было четыре стены), a floor and a roof (пол и крыша), which made one room (которые образовывали одну комнату, to make — делать, конструировать, создавать); and this room contained a rusty looking cookstove (и в этой комнате находились: ржавая на вид кухонная плита; to contain — содержать в себе, иметь /в своем составе/; to look — смотреть, глядеть; выглядеть, иметь вид), a cupboard for the dishes (буфет для посуды; dish — тарелка, миска; посуда), a table (стол), three or four chairs (три или четыре стула), and the beds (и кровати).

Dorothy ['dOrqTI], Kansas ['kxnzqs], prairie ['pre(q)rI], uncle [ANkl], aunt [Q:nt], lumber ['lAmbq], cookstove ['kukstquv]

Dorothy lived in the midst of the great Kansas prairies, with Uncle Henry, who was a farmer, and Aunt Em, who was the farmer's wife.

Their house was small, for the lumber to build it had to be carried by wagon many miles.

There were four walls, a floor and a roof, which made one room; and this room contained a rusty looking cookstove, a cupboard for the dishes, a table, three or four chairs, and the beds.

Uncle Henry and Aunt Em had a big bed in one corner (у Дядюшки Генри и Тетушки Эм была большая кровать в одном углу /комнаты/), and Dorothy a little bed in another corner (а у Дороти /была/ маленькая кровать в другом углу /комнаты/).

There was no garret at all (чердака не было вовсе; at all — совсем, полностью), and no cellar except a small hole dug in the ground (не было и подвала, за исключением небольшой ямы, выкопанной в земле; hole — дыра, отверстие; яма, воронка; to dig — копать, рыть), called a cyclone cellar (называемой = которую называли ураганным подвалом), where the family could go (куда семья могла бы пойти = спуститься) in case one of those great whirlwinds arose (в случае, /если бы/ поднялся один из тех сильных ураганов; to arise — возникать, появляться; great — большой, огромный; сильный, интенсивный) mighty enough to crush any building in its path (мощных настолько, чтобы разрушить любое здание на своем пути; to crush — давить, жать; сокрушить, уничтожить). It was reached by a trap door in the middle of the floor (до него = до подвала добирались через люк в полу, /расположенный/ посередине /комнаты/; to reach — протягивать, вытягивать; достигать, добираться; trap-door — люк, опускная дверь), from which a ladder led down into the small, dark hole (от которого лестница вела вниз, в маленькую темную яму; to lead).

garret ['gxrIt], cellar ['selq], cyclone ['saIklqun], whirlwind ['wq:lwInd]

Uncle Henry and Aunt Em had a big bed in one corner, and Dorothy a little bed in another corner.

There was no garret at all, and no cellar — except a small hole dug in the ground, called a cyclone cellar, where the family could go in case one of those great whirlwinds arose, mighty enough to crush any building in its path. It was reached by a trap door in the middle of the floor, from which a ladder led down into the small, dark hole.

When Dorothy stood in the doorway and looked around (когда Дороти стояла в дверях и смотрела вокруг; doorway — дверной проем), she could see nothing but the great gray prairie on every side (она не могла увидеть ничего = она не видела ничего, кроме огромной = бескрайней серой прерии со всех сторон: «с каждой стороны»).

Not a tree nor a house broke the broad sweep of flat country (ни дерево, ни дом не нарушали широких просторов равнинной местности; to break — ломать; прерывать, нарушать; sweep — выметание, подметание; пространство, охватываемое взглядом, простор; flat — плоский; нерельефный, плоский; country — страна; местность) that reached to the edge of the sky in all directions (которая доходила до края неба во всех направлениях; edge — острие, лезвие; край, кромка). The sun had baked the plowed land into a gray mass (солнце обожгло вспаханную землю, /превратив ее/ в серую массу; to bake — печь, выпекать; припекать, сушить), with little cracks running through it (с маленькими трещинками, бегущими по ней; to run — бежать, бегать; тянуться, простираться).

doorway ['dO:weI], sweep [swi:p], plow [plau], mass [mxs]

When Dorothy stood in the doorway and looked around, she could see nothing but the great gray prairie on every side. Not a tree nor a house broke the broad sweep of flat country that reached to the edge of the sky in all directions. The sun had baked the plowed land into a gray mass, with little cracks running through it.

Even the grass was not green (даже трава не была зеленой), for the sun had burned the tops of the long blades (так как солнце выжгло длинные былинки: «верхнюю поверхность длинных травинок»; top — верхушка, вершина /мачты, горы и т. д.

/; верхняя поверхность; blade — лезвие; длинный узкий лист) until they were the same gray color to be seen everywhere (пока они не стали того же серого цвета, который был виден повсюду).

Once the house had been painted (когда-то дом был покрашен; once — один раз; когда-то, некогда), but the sun blistered the paint (но солнце облупило краску; blister — волдырь, водяной пузырь; to blister — вызывать пузыри) and the rains washed it away (и дожди смыли ее; to wash — мыть, обмывать; to wash away — смывать, вымывать), and now the house was as dull and gray as everything else (и теперь дом был таким же тусклым и серым, как и все остальное; dull — тупой, глупый; тусклый, серый).

grass [grQ:s], green [gri:n], burn [bq:n], blister ['blIstq]

Even the grass was not green, for the sun had burned the tops of the long blades until they were the same gray color to be seen everywhere. Once the house had been painted, but the sun blistered the paint and the rains washed it away, and now the house was as dull and gray as everything else.

When Aunt Em came there to live she was a young, pretty wife (когда Тетушка Эм приехала сюда жить, она была молодой прелестной женой).

The sun and wind had changed her, too (солнце и ветер изменили и ее тоже).

They had taken the sparkle from her eyes (они забрали блеск из ее глаз = они лишили ее глаза блеска; sparkle — искорка; блеск, сверкание) and left them a sober gray (и оставили их неяркого серого /цвета/; to leave — уходить, уезжать; оставлять в каком-либо положении или состоянии; sober — трезвый; неяркий, спокойный /о цвете/); they had taken the red from her cheeks and lips (они забрали румянец ее щек и красноту ее губ; red — красный цвет, краснота), and they were gray also (и они также были серыми). She was thin and gaunt (она была худая и костлявая), and never smiled now (и теперь никогда не улыбалась). When Dorothy, who was an orphan, first came to her (когда Дороти, которая была сиротой, впервые приехала к ней), Aunt Em had been so startled by the child's laughter (Тетушка Эм была настолько напугана смехом девочки: «ребенка») that she would scream and press her hand upon her heart (что вскрикивала и прижимала /свою/ руку к /своему/ сердцу /каждый раз/; scream — вопль, пронзительный крик; to scream — пронзительно кричать, вопить) whenever Dorothy's merry voice reached her ears (когда веселый голосок Дороти долетал до ее ушей; to reach — протягивать, вытягивать; доходить, достигать слуха); and she still looked at the little girl with wonder (и она все еще глядела на маленькую девочку с удивлением) that she could find anything to laugh at (что та могла найти над чем посмеяться: «найти что-то, /чтобы/ посмеяться над /этим/»).

young [jAN], sober ['squbq], gaunt [gO:nt], laughter ['lQ:ftq]

When Aunt Em came there to live she was a young, pretty wife.

The sun and wind had changed her, too. They had taken the sparkle from her eyes and left them a sober gray; they had taken the red from her cheeks and lips, and they were gray also. She was thin and gaunt, and never smiled now.

When Dorothy, who was an orphan, first came to her, Aunt Em had been so startled by the child's laughter that she would scream and press her hand upon her heart whenever Dorothy's merry voice reached her ears; and she still looked at the little girl with wonder that she could find anything to laugh at.

Uncle Henry never laughed (дядюшка Генри никогда не смеялся).

He worked hard from morning till night (он много работал с утра до ночи; hard — сильно, интенсивно; настойчиво, упорно; to work hard — много работать) and did not know what joy was (и не знал, что такое радость).

He was gray also (он тоже был серым), from his long beard to his rough boots (от длинной бороды до грубых ботинок), and he looked stern and solemn (и выглядел он суровым и серьезным), and rarely spoke (и говорил редко).

It was Toto that made Dorothy laugh (именно Тото заставлял Дороти смеяться; to make smb. do smth.

— заставлять, побуждать кого-либо делать что-либо), and saved her from growing as gray as her other surroundings (и уберег ее от того, чтобы она стала такой же серой, как все ее окружение; to save — спасать; уберегать; to grow — произрастать, расти; делаться, становиться; surroundings — окрестности; среда, окружение). Toto was not gray (Тото не был серым; ср.

: gray — серый; мрачный, безрадостный); he was a little black dog (он был небольшим черным псом = это был маленький черный песик), with long silky hair and small black eyes (с длинной шелковистой шерстью и маленькими черными глазками; hair — волосы; шерсть /собаки, кошки и т. п.

/) that twinkled merrily on either side of his funny, wee nose (которые весело поблескивали с каждой стороны = по сторонам его забавного крошечного носа; twinkle — мигание; огонек, блеск в глазах; to twinkle — блестеть, сверкать). Toto played all day long (Тото играл весь день напролет), and Dorothy played with him (и Дороти играла вместе с ним), and loved him dearly (и нежно его любила).

joy [dZOI], beard [bIqd], rough [rAf], solemn ['sOlqm], surrounding [sq'raundIN]

Uncle Henry never laughed. He worked hard from morning till night and did not know what joy was. He was gray also, from his long beard to his rough boots, and he looked stern and solemn, and rarely spoke.

It was Toto that made Dorothy laugh, and saved her from growing as gray as her other surroundings. Toto was not gray; he was a little black dog, with long silky hair and small black eyes that twinkled merrily on either side of his funny, wee nose. Toto played all day long, and Dorothy played with him, and loved him dearly.

Ссылка на основную публикацию
Adblock
detector